Hiccups in Oncology

Hiccups can occur with tumors in the cardiac region, for instance, or be centrally induced. Hiccups can last for days or weeks and be extremely tormenting for patients.

With each normal inhalation, a person’s soul body connects more closely with their rhythmic system, only to then detach itself somewhat again with each exhalation. All states of mental tension (e.g., fright) are associated with an emphasis on inhalation, whereas exhalation dominates in relaxed states of mind. 
With hiccups, the intervention of the soul body becomes too strong, resulting in spasmodic, involuntary contractions of the diaphragm, as can be seen from the patient’s intensified, staccato-like repetitive inhalation. 

The therapeutic aim is, on the one hand, to release the soul body and thus the overly alert consciousness from its cramping activity, and on the other hand, to connect the soul in a healthy way with the body regions below the diaphragm, right down into the feet.

Research news

Anthroposophic Medicine is an evaluated part of CRF treatment   
Cancer-realted fatigue (CRF) is one of the most frequent and prevalent symptoms expressed by cancer patients and cancer survivors. A current systematic review aimed to identify different clinical evaluation scales and interventions available for fatigue associated with cancer. Therefore, 2611 research articles were screened and revealed also non-pharmacological interventions such as exercise, complementary therapies, nutritional and psychoeducational interventions, sleep therapy, Anthroposophic Medicine, and various pharmacological agents effective in managing CRF. The results are published open access: 
https://doi.org/10.25259/IJPC_455_20.
Supplementary note: The impact of misteltoe therapy in CRF has been evaluated by a research group at Havelhöhe Community Hospital: 
https://doi.org/10.1177/1534735420917211


Further information on Anthroposophic Medicine