Hiccups in Oncology

Hiccups can occur with tumors in the cardiac region, for instance, or be centrally induced. Hiccups can last for days or weeks and be extremely tormenting for patients.

With each normal inhalation, a person’s soul body connects more closely with their rhythmic system, only to then detach itself somewhat again with each exhalation. All states of mental tension (e.g., fright) are associated with an emphasis on inhalation, whereas exhalation dominates in relaxed states of mind. 
With hiccups, the intervention of the soul body becomes too strong, resulting in spasmodic, involuntary contractions of the diaphragm, as can be seen from the patient’s intensified, staccato-like repetitive inhalation. 

The therapeutic aim is, on the one hand, to release the soul body and thus the overly alert consciousness from its cramping activity, and on the other hand, to connect the soul in a healthy way with the body regions below the diaphragm, right down into the feet.

Research news

Pilot study  on the clinical effect of yarrow liver compresses  
Liver compresses are commonly applied in integrative cancer treatment and are believed to have an energizing effect. A randomized pilot study was conducted to investigate the influence of yarrow liver compresses on the autonomic nervous system by analyzing heart rate variability in metastatic cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy and suffering from cancer-related fatigue. The study found that this application led to increased sympathetic activity during daytime in the intervention group, whereas in the control group, which did not receive any external application, increased parasympathetic activity. The study is open access:  
https://doi.org/10.1177/15347354221081253


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