Rhythmical Massage Therapy for Constipation

The general approach to treatment of constipation with rhythmical massage therapy includes promoting peristaltic function in the metabolic area, loosening cramped abdominal, lumbar and neck muscles, building strength, stabilizing the cardiovascular system, conveying calm and relaxation, and enabling a coherent experience of the body in the sense of: I feel comfortable in my body.

The therapeutic approach

  • Abdominal massages
    The therapist forms her gestures thoroughly and intensively, especially in the releasing phase.
    Targeted use of friction and vibration to activate intestinal peristalsis.
    Solar plexus strokes with
    Oxalis e planta tota W 10% oil WALA if there is pain 

  • Efferent treatment of the neck
    To stimulate and enliven, according to the polarity principle: back-above, front-below.

  • Pelvis treatment
    To warm the nerve plexus in the area of the anus: thorough, deep kneading of the gluteal muscles, with intense friction in the area between the iliac crest and the lumbar spine.

  • Leg massages, possibly a hip treatment in a lateral position
    Sculpted, efferent leg treatments to promote excretion and regulation of congestion.

  • Rhythmical embrocation of the kidneys. If necessary, the patient can lie on one side:
    Argentum metallicum praep. 0.4% ointment WELEDA or peat oil with silver WANDIL (available as Torföl mit Silber) or
    peat oil with Equisetum WANDIL (available as Torföl mit Equisetum).
    To generally stimulate organ function use
    Red Copper Ointment WALA (also available as Kupfer Salbe rot) or peat oil with copper WANDIL (available as Torföl mit Kupfer).


  • Abdominal compresses with carraway oil
    have also proven to be a valuable therapeutic aid and can be used in combination before or after treatment. 

Research news

Real World Data Study: Factors Associated with Self-Reported Post/Long-COVID    
Little evidence exists on the risk factors that contribute to Post/Long-COVID (PLC). In a recent prospective study, 99 registered people reported suffering from PLC symptoms - most commonly from fatigue, dyspnea, decreased strenght, hyposmia, and memory loss. The study results show, for example, that people, who suffered from COVID-19-associated anxiety, hyposmia, or palpitations were up to eight times more at risk of developing PLC than people without these symptoms. Individuals who suffered from fatigue during COVID-19 treatment were seven times more at risk to develop PLC fatigue than those who did not show this symptom. Overall, the results revealed that 13% of the study participants who had previously suffered from COVID-19 subsequently reported having PLC. The article is published open access: 
https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192316124.


Further information on Anthroposophic Medicine